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Polar coordinates of a line

In mathematics, the polar coordinate system is a two-dimensional coordinate system in which each point on a plane is determined by a distance from a fixed ... more

Linear equation( Point–slope form)

A linear equation is an algebraic equation in which each term is either a constant or the product of a constant and (the first power of) a single variable. ... more

Slope

In mathematics, the slope or gradient of a line is a number that describes both the direction and the steepness of the line. Slope is often denoted by the ... more

Euler line (its slope related to the slopes of the sides of a triangle)

In geometry, the Euler line is a line determined from any triangle that is not equilateral. It passes through several important points determined from the ... more

Archimedean spiral

The Archimedean spiral is the locus of points corresponding to the locations over time of a point moving away from a fixed point with a constant speed ... more

Euler's line Equation (any triangle)

In geometry, the Euler line is a line determined from any triangle that is not equilateral. It passes through several important points determined from the ... more

Log-polar coordinates (radial coordinate )

Log-polar coordinates in the plane consist of a pair of real numbers (ρ,θ), where ρ is the logarithm of the distance between a given point and the origin ... more

Distance between two points (three-space)

Distance is a numerical description of how far apart objects are. In analytic geometry, the distance between two points of the xyz-plane in three-space, ... more

Mohr–Coulomb failure criterion

Mohr–Coulomb theory is a mathematical model describing the response of brittle materials such as concrete, or rubble piles, to shear stress as well as ... more

Vertical Hyperbola (Standard Equation)

Hyperbola is the set of all points in the plane, such that the absolute value of the difference of each of the distances from two fixed points is constant. ... more

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